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Returning you to recreational sport

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Getting you back on the pitch

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Beating knee pain

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Regaining your independence

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Full range of knee surgery, to suit you

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Andrew Lavender

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Patellofemoral (PTF) Knee Replacement

PTF Knee Replacement

Aim of Surgery

It is done to remove the pain from arthritis that only affects the part of the knee between the Knee Cap (Patella) and the Thigh Bone (Femur) in younger people.

The final decision about your suitability for a Patellofemoral Knee Replacement can only be made at the time of surgery. Mr Lavender will always tell you this and explain that should the knee have more arthritis than expected at the time of surgery then he will change and do a Full (Total) Knee Replacement


Before Surgery

Pre-Operative Assessment of fitness for surgery:
- This is usually undertaken by one of the nurses at the hospital
to make sure that you are fit enough for the operation
- You will usually have blood tests and may also have a tracing
of your heart (ECG) or a chest X-ray

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT):
- This does not require stopping prior to surgery, but please tell us when you are admitted to ensure that we give you
injections to help prevent you getting a blood clot in your leg


In Hospital

Scratches / Cuts
- If you have any scratches, cuts or the like on your leg when you are admitted for surgery then your operation may be
postponed if Mr Lavender believes that these will pose a risk to you getting an infection at the time of your surgery

Consent
- Mr Lavender will come and see you when you arrive. He will get you to sign a form (Consent Form) agreeing to the
operation and explain the risks of the surgery

Stay
- You will normally stay in hospital for 3 to 5 days

Anaesthetic
- Usually the surgery is done under a spinal anaesthetic (Needle in the back that numbs the legs) as this is better for
you
- The final decision is made after a discussion between yourself and the anaesthetist

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)
- There is a risk of getting a blood clot in your leg after the operation
- You will be started on a course if injections to help prevent you getting a blood clot and these last for 14 days after
your surgery
- You will be encouraged to walk as soon as possible after your operation to help the blood flow in your legs and
reduce the chances of blood clots

Walking
- You can walk with all your weight on the operated leg as soon as the anaesthetic wears off
- You will have a pair of crutches to help you walk. You can stop using them when you feel able


Rehabilitation

Physiotherapy
- There will be lots of this after your operation to keep your knee moving through a full range of movement
- Keeping the ability to get your knee straight is very important

Range of Movement
- The range of movement you get in your knee after the operation is usually the range of movement you had before the
surgery

Swelling
- The leg that is operated on often stays swollen compared to the other leg for up to 6 months

Warmth
- The skin over the knee on the leg that has been operated on often feels warmer than the other knee for 6 months

Numbness
- The knee that has been operated on often has an area of numbness next to the scar that improves over 18 months

Stitches
- Mr Lavender usually uses clips. These do not hurt when being removed. They are usually removed after 2 weeks
when you come to see Mr Lavender in the out patients department

Driving
- You are unable to drive for at least:
- Left leg (6 weeks)
- Right left (12 weeks)

Work
- This depends upon the type of work you do and should be discussed with Mr Lavender. As a rough guide you will be
off work for 6 to 8 weeks

Sick note
- Mr Lavender will provide you with a sick note if you require one

Kneeling
- This can be done when you feel comfortable
- 80% of patients are able to kneel on the operated knee after the surgery

Flying
- You are not allowed to fly for 6 weeks following your surgery, due to the risk of blood clots in your legs

Sport
- Your return depends upon the type of sport and should be discussed with Mr Lavender


Follow up

Mr Lavender will normally see you 6 weeks following your surgery in the out-patients department.


Expectations

For a condensed version of this page, click on the PDF below or right-click and choose 'Save Link As...' to download a copy to your computer.

Patello-Femoral Knee Replacement Expectations


Sport After Knee Joint Replacement

For more information about going back to sport after a knee replacement, download the free PDF below:

To download the Sport after Knee Joint Replacement information sheet, right click on the PDF and choose 'Save Link As...'

Sport after Knee Joint Replacement

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